Rex London | Planning Permission for Extensions
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Planning Permission for Extensions

Planning Permission for Extensions

Planning consent may or may not be required for your proposed extension. Under the Permitted Development Rights system a large number of home extensions can be built without the requirement of planning permission. As one of London’s leading building companies, our reputation is built on focussing on the client’s needs and assisting on any project from the initial design right through to planning applications and liaising with local authorities to getting the job done swiftly.

  • You can extend a detached dwelling by 8m to the rear if it’s single storey or 3m if it’s double.
  • There are height restrictions. A single storey extension not being higher than 4m in height to the ridge and the eaves, and ridge heights of any extension not being higher than the existing property.
  • Two storey extensions must not be closer than 7m to the rear boundary.
  •  It must be built in the same or similar material to the existing dwelling.
  • Extensions must not go forward of the building line of the original dwelling.
  • Side extensions must be single storey, maximum height of 4m and a width no more than half of the original building.
  • In Designated Areas side extensions require planning permission and all rear extensions must be single storey.
  • An extension must not result in more than half the garden being covered.
  • You can only do it once and the original building is either as it was on 1st July 1948 or when it was built. In Northern Ireland it is as it was built or as it was on 1st October 1973.

You should bear in mind that if your house is in a Conservation Area or a National Park, the amount of work one can do under Permitted Development is usually reduced.

Your local authority has the power to remove Permitted Development Rights if it feels the character of the area wll be threatened by any new work. If in any doubt, you should check with your local authority planning department.

If you are doing an extension that will need planning permission, it is wise to pop into your local planning office to find out informally what might be permitted — especially if you are planning anything out of the ordinary. It is always wise to research the local planning policies so that you will be aware from the start that an uphill struggle awaits you if you plan anything too exotic in the area where your house is situated.